Home Forums Campfire Forum a video of a "outside of the box" hunt

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    • jason samkowiak
      Post count: 141

      This video i made to show how i deal with the massive amounts of gun hunter pressure here in michigan.

      It shows my “outside the box” thinking with my funnel choice for this hunt. It also has a couple twists and different kind of ending.

      I originally intended for it to be a quick video aobut the funnel and dealing with pressure but then just let you guys follow along for the remainer of the hunt and how it unfolded.

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      I’ve learned much from you, Jason, here and on another site. I feel your pain. That would just flip my trigger to have them yodel dogs capitalize on my good hunt.

      Sorry for the loss, but had you stayed with her, no telling how far you’d have pushed her.

      That is a neat concept of a funnel. Our bow season here dies 2 weeks before gun deer… but bow bear is in although not hunted hard yet that I know of… bear gun comes in next Wed. I don’t hunt bear. I figure a) it would be cold to hunt bear as I like my clothing and b) it would be painful going thru briars bear (bare?) 🙂

      Thanks for that informative clip!

    • Col Mike
      Member
      Post count: 911

      jasonsamko wrote: This video i made to show how i deal with the massive amounts of gun hunter pressure here in michigan.

      It shows my “outside the box” thinking with my funnel choice for this hunt. It also has a couple twists and different kind of ending.

      I originally intended for it to be a quick video aobut the funnel and dealing with pressure but then just let you guys follow along for the remainer of the hunt and how it unfolded.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQraXSseA9k

      Jason–as the doc said your video’s are very good. Just for your info your “funnels” in my previous life were called avenues of approach but the concept is the same–The terrain is a sheet of music and we all move on it to create the notes–ya just have to be able to read it.

      Don’t be to hard on the coyotes “god’s dog”, after all they were doing the same thing you were doing only difference is they had to eat to survive–you can go to the store:D And they have been doing it long before we came

      and are a sign of healthy eco system.

      Semper Fi and good luck on the buck.

      Mike

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      colmike wrote:

      Don’t be to hard on the coyotes “god’s dog”, after all they were doing the same thing you were doing only difference is they had to eat to survive–you can go to the store:D And they have been doing it long before we came

      and are a sign of healthy eco system.

      Mike

      Col Mike,

      I respectfully disagree.

      Spoken like a true conservationist or someone who’s not trailed a deer till 2am in the morning only to have dogs eat the best parts of what they didn’t catch nor kill.

      I think the “God’s dogs” statement is what triggered my response. If God chose a dog, I’d think it would be the wolf. As in “Hondo”, the movie, the Apache comments that the cougar screams insults and is brave, but the coyote screams insults and is a coward!

      I for one cannot elevate the coyote to a place of honor. Having stared into those devilish yellow eyes in pale light, I see them much more of the devil then Deity! 😈 Nothing more than a buzzard on 4 legs, in my somewhat stilted opinion.

      Thanks for allowing me to air my alternate view!

    • Charles Ek
      Moderator
      Post count: 563

      The “God’s dog” phrase originated among the Navajo. They called wolves “big coyotes”.

      If I lose a deer to coyotes, it’s because they are better hunters. Not because they’re “cowards” or “buzzards”. Nor do I own that deer until it is in my possession.

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      Feelings (and their attendant emotions) are powerful— and very PERSONAL.

      We each have our own, often based on personal experiences.

      I don’t or did not MEAN to challenge anyone else’s views or feelings, but I simply disagree that coyotes finding a dying or dead deer have “hunted” and deserve to be called “hunters”.

      Simply a perspective that is personal and based on my own feelings. No offense meant to anyone who feels differently.

      Unfortunately, many states back East disallow use of leashed dogs to trail wounded deer… It’s my belief that a coyote will “scent trail” a wounded deer and wait until it’s unable to flee or try to defend itself, then capitalize on that. Hunter?

      Many household dogs would be able to do the same thing and I wish the laws would change.

      I do agree in large part that no animal is “ours” until in hand. Once injury to any animal occurs by my hand, I become quite personally connected to that animal.

      I admire Jason’s desire and others, who once having wounded an animal, to punch their tag.

      Again, my views are mine alone, but I’ve reached a comfort stage with some of my views over many years of field time. Reading differing views from my own, always allows those new views to linger in my mind and cause me to re-think, expand and grow as an outdoorsman and hunter.

      I appreciate the opportunity to air my views, whether in support or contrast to others that are posted, but do so only to balance the scale, not to cause ire or discord.

      If my sharing my OWN views did so, please accept my apology.

    • Ptaylor
      Member
      Post count: 579

      One time while working in the Rocky’s during winter, I found where some coyotes had killed a big mule deer buck. All they had eaten was the front shoulder, as the kill was very fresh. So I cut the backstraps and hams off that deer and took it home! Sometimes it goes the other way and I’m the scavenger!!

    • Charles Ek
      Moderator
      Post count: 563

      On the subject of the video in question – Jason, I really enjoyed seeing someone else use a tactic I use, particularly with a detailed analysis of the terrain and cover included.

      On the land I hunt, I have the advantage of knowing it almost as well as the deer and coyotes do. We have ever more hunting pressure in this area on publicly-accessible land as development continues and more private land is posted. I frequently “employ” other hunters as drivers without them being aware they’ve been hired for the job. 😉

    • jason samkowiak
      Post count: 141

      yeah i have a love hate relationship with the yotes. I lvoe them for thier cunning and skills. I envy them for thier persistance and detrmination. but i hate when they beat me to my food.

      The funnel worked perfectly. That was the whole point of the video was to show a unique and differnt way to get into deer and think like they do. hopefully it proves helpfull to a few that hunt similar situations.

      Thanks for watching and all the comments.

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2371

      So… What was the story with the shot? Where did you hit the deer that it looked good but the deer went so far? Did the arrow kill the deer… or did the coyote’s?

    • William Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Steve Graf wrote: So… What was the story with the shot? Where did you hit the deer that it looked good but the deer went so far? Did the arrow kill the deer… or did the coyote’s?

      Great video and I love how your plan worked. As for the shot I agree on your analysis, I shot one that did the same thing one time but I did find it after a few hours of trailing.

      Looking at your setup and the angle of the wound channel My guess is you were close to 20′ up. If you would come down to about 15′ you can reduce the steepness of the shot angle and maybe able to avoid that. I used to do the same thing then I found I got just as many shots at 14-15 feet and the shot angle was better. Don’t know if you were looking for us to critique it or not but I thought I would offer up what I thought I saw in the video. Also I do understand that height is sometimes necessary where there is little cover and this time of year all the understory is gone so I do understand why some will go higher in that situation.

    • jason samkowiak
      Post count: 141

      Steve and Duncan,

      I didnt take the time to slowly open her and anyalize the shot location. but it looked like the enterence was just inside the diaphram missing the close lung and taking out the opposit lung on the far side. but could of hit the front lung and went below the opposite lung as well. i think it was the first way but like i said i didnt take the time to find out for sure. but classic one lung hit reaction. i was using a 2 blade magnus 1 broadhead.

      Not sure if the coyotes killed her or my arrow did. I have hit one lung deer before and had them live for a long time. one was over 48 hours thank god for good snow as i recoverd that deer. But i have also had one lung deer die in a few hours but those also included gut and one lung.

      its crazy how all that works. when i let the arrow go and watched the fletching disapear into her i thought she wwould be dead in 60 yards. yet many years ago i shanked a shot on a doe and hit her right above the rear hip and when i saw the arrow hit my heart sank. she jumped in the air and then stood still and feel over dead (artery severed) 2 yards from where i hit her….shorted track job ever had other than a spine shot. go figure. it just goes to show deer meat is not deer meat until its in the freezer.

      Duncan, I totally agree about the treestand height. I learned my lesson on that a long time ago, some of the one lung hits earlier on. I usually try to hunt between 14 and 16 feet (how ever high 3 36″ sticks will get me). Great advise, and imo very important to not get to high if you plan to shoot close as the angle just doesnt work for a soild double lung hit. i should of taken the time to verify if i missed the lung on the shot side or the opposite side but i was too mad and disgusted to worry about it when i dressed her. either way my shot imo was too far back by about 2 inches and low by 1 inch. 2 inches more and i would of did my favorite kind of shot. double lung with a broken opposite leg. game over fast with easy trailing and lost of noise crashing.

    • mhay
      Post count: 264

      Great video and hunt . Too bad about the ‘yotes and hind quarters.

      It’s youth gun season here this weekend but archers are allowed to hunt providing they wear Blaze Orange.

      My brother-in-law has one of those FUNNELS on his property and I intend to be there this afternoon . We saw two bucks and some does using it just before dark yesterday . They saw 8 this morning but took no shot .

      They also heard 3 different flocks of turkeys so there could be some turkey action as well . Though I doubt there would be a shot since I’ll be wearing the Blaze. Ambushing could be a good possiblity but I won’t shoot a turkey I didn’t call .

    • James Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Excellent video Jason. Like Mike said, different lingo perhaps but your terrain analysis is just the same as a soldier looking to set an ambush. Just another animal to hunt.

      On a different note, I asked you after another of your videos about tree stands vs ground blinds to which you gave me convincing explanations. The start of this video though was an excellent example of that shot angle opening up that little sapling area you showed us. I could imagine on the ground having very limited fire lanes through that, but up in the air you have a lot more opportunities. It may have been an unintentional education but I appreciate it all the same 😉

      Cheers,

      Jim

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