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    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2762

      In pursuit of my ongoing “terminal gear” quest — that is, taking advantage of the excuse that, after a lifetime of buying mostly the cheapest of everything, I can now justify buying quality because at my age good gear should last longer than I will and I’ll never have to replace it — I have learned a lot from our discussions about wool shirts and pants.

      Next on the list is a new rain suit. So far as staying dry and relatively comfy, I’ve always done fine. What I’d like to find now is a rain suit that is simultaneously light and compact enough to carry almost constantly (here in the high Rockies only beginners trust that a blue-sky day will stay that way), and can actually hunt in. The primary problem I’ve encountered is that most rain gear is “hard shell,” that is, has a slick exterior against which rain “splats” so loud you can’t hear anything, and is also noisy when moving through brush. This problem, noise, is what generally forces me to quit hunting in a hard rain, esp. when the hood is up. What “soft shell” rain gear I’ve seen tends to be cloth-like thus heavy and bulky.

      So what I’m looking for is, like affordable heavy Merino pants, probably not even available, to wit: rain gear that keeps you dry, that “breathes” so that you don’t sweat yourself wet, that is quiet even with a hard rain pelting on it, yet is not too bulky or heavy to keep permanently in a hunting day pack. Affordability would be nice as well.

      Does anyone know if such a beast exists? Thanks, Dave

    • Reg Darling
      Post count: 33

      Swandri (Swanni) wool is sold in New Zealand as rain gear since the weave is so tight–over 200 threads per inch. Check out their bush shirt (which is really a coat). I have a Peter Storm rain suit that I like a lot–the exterior is slick though soft enough that it’s not noisy in brush though havey raindrops will make an audible splat.

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 761

      I’m about to buy a ventile jacket, its cotton based but the material is woven in such a way that when it gets wet it expands and becomes waterproof. With luck I should get it next week and will post some comments.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventile

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 2762

      Pothunter — I checked the reference and it looks promising. I tried the Wiggies link and it led to nothing; I’ll try googling it. For now, can you tell us from where you are ordering the jacket and at what cost? Sounds like the up sides include quietness and having a “rain suit” built into other garments. Presumed down side might include weight, bulk, and cost. Do keep us posted. Interesting …

    • kjlarson
      Post count: 26

      Interesting topic. A large percent of my fall hunt here in western Washington means dealing with rain or sopping wet bushes and ground cover. I have tried many types of rain gear but have always ended up wet.

      I have settled with the wool. I still get wet but as long as long as I keep moving I stay reasonably warm.

      What is especially frustrating is my boots filling up with water. They stay drier longer when I wear my thick wool pants. I think the pants absorb more water but even they reach a limit.

    • YankeeRedneck
      Post count: 15

      I found a frogg toog suit on sale at the bass pro shop and was thinking of wearing a bug suit over the top to muffle the noise.

      Hadn’t done it yet but wool sounds so much better just to hot to wear in Georgia!Tongue out

    • wahoo
      Member
      Post count: 404

      Dave luv my wool . I have Pete Storm which is great but I do not hunt in ( bulk – noise ) but what I did get and hunt in and I don’t seem to have problems with is Frog toggs – seems to be good stuff and as far as most things go cheap. Doctor Don turned me on to both of these items

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 761

      I’ve ordered mine from Snowsled, found them by accident.
      The one I have on order is at the top of the link. There is no bulk to ventile and should work well with wool, I hope.
      If all goes well I’ll put up some info and pics next week, the way the weather is shaping up it should arrive just in time.
      http://www.snowsled.com/outdoor-clothing/ventile-clothing/classic-smock/

      Mark.

    • skifrk
      Post count: 387

      I have found the mad dog rain gear works well with alnog with being fairly quiet.

    • M
      Post count: 107

      Few years back I purchased Guide Series Tech 2.5 rainsuit from Gander Mt. Flexible, light, packable(pants and jacket come with a stuff sack). Quiet well not as quiet as wool. I throw it on as an outer layer for a shower but if it is a day long rain I put it on between my long johns and my outer layer. Cotton during turkey season and fleece or wool in the fall/winter.

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1379

      Frogg Toggs, very lightweight, breathable and waterproof. Bass Pro now has a camo knock off if you want camo. Same type of non-woven fabric.

      Duncan

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 2762

      Well thanks for all the good leads, fellers. I’ve check out as many as I could trace, and last night ordered some Frogg Toggs. For $69.99 from the manufacturer, including priority mail postage, for a top and bottom, choice of camo pattern, lightweight and packable, breathable with all the right features and several good recommendations here, I don’t see how I can go very far wrong. If I lived in the Pacific NW or AK I could perhaps justify some of the more top-end stuff. But mostly I carry rain gear for emergency use, for those rare times when it rains like a waterfall and wool isn’t enough. Thanks again, Dave

    • wahoo
      Member
      Post count: 404

      Dave once you test them out let us know how you feel about them

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 761

      My Ventile arrived today (receipt straight in the shredder no need to leave incriminating evidence lying about), I’ve taken some pics but cant upload them for some reason.

      There are minimum seams a velcro adjuster on the back of the hood, long zip on front with two map size chest pockets and a draw string. It’s nice and long so will keep the worst of the weather off the tops of my legs. it will also easily fold into the hood so packs away quite well.

      Looks like the weather will oblige at the weekend so we’ll see how it performs in the rain.

      Mark.

    • Duck816
      Post count: 10

      I use 5.11 rain gear. Its a company that primarily builds gear for military and law enforcement. A lot of their stuff is just like you said “noisy” but they have a few soft shells that are very quiet. They also offer various camo patterns. its also a lot lighter than frog toggs. i have a pair of toggs too and i love them, but i bike to work every day and my 5.11 jacket fits in my pack almost with out me noticing. They are expensive but I’m going on ten years with my jacket.

    • M
      Post count: 107

      You could always skip the rain suit and use an umbrella.It could also double as a blind.

    • Lawrence Hansen
      Member
      Post count: 16

      Hi Dave,

      http://www.filson.com will showcase several new items hunters might like. Prices are high as is quality. You get what you pay for applies. Specifically, 24 oz mackinaw wool pants with suspender buttons and side pockets. Yep, dry clean only and NOT merino. BUT, 10 1/2 oz, 12 oz and 21 oz Alaskan 2 pc long johns, merino wool and machihne washable. Smile

      F.Y.I.

    • Don Thomas
      Member
      Post count: 339

      After all those years in AK, I’ve tried everything. Peter Storm is excellent but pricey, and binds just a bit. Swazi is also excellent (quiet, comfortable, durable) but again pricey, and only their models with GoreTex incorporated into the fabric will keep you dry with prolonged exposue to driving rain (they are REALLY pricey!) Frogg Togs are terrific (light weight, surprisingly durable, and cheap) but noisy. What I do now is wear a Frogg Togg jacket underneath a standard Swazi coat. The inside of the Swazi may get damp after a long day, but the inner layer will keep the moisture away from your skin and the Swazi fabric is very easy to dry even under camp conditions. The outer coat mutes the noise from the FTs. When I’m guiding rifle hunters, I wear chest waders all the time when I’m out on the tundra. That’s about the only way you can keep your lower 2/3 dry when you’re sitting on wet ground glassing or hiking through wet brush all day. They are usually a bit too noisy for bowhunting, although Simms is coming out with a model that I think may be quiet enough. I plan to field test soon. Don

    • stykbender
      Post count: 6

      Dave’

      Carried Cabela’s MT050 and Rain Suede for several years but bulk and weight caused our parting.

      I now use Cabela’s Space Rain gear in Colorado. Usually the showers quit soon enough that the Dryplus has not wet thru. I have been out long enough (all day downpour) here in Alabama where they did. Compact and light they stay in my fannypack or backpack. Bought the top large enough to even cover my pack. Had one pair of pants rip in ’04 but Cabela’s replaced them. They guarantee their products unconditionally!

    • Amoose
      Post count: 80

      Much like the other guy from Washington, its my boots and pant-legs that get the wettest, seems like the ferns and salal just collect water to share.

      I pretty much just spray all my clothes with several light coats of “Camp Dry”, carry a couple changes of socks, have a change of shoes/boots at the truck, and a boot dryer in camp.

      I still get wet, but wool keeps me warm, and as long as my feet are comfortable, I keep hunting.

      Although I am currently attempting to procure a CADPAT rain-suit, it is probably going to be a futile effort, as they are only available to Canadian military…

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