New books 2012-12-29T02:17:43+00:00

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  • tailfeather
    Member
    Post count: 417
    #7100 |

    Got some “new” books from the in-laws today. I get excited about books.:D

    Richard Nelson “Make Prayers to the Raven”

    Jim Posewitz “Beyond Fair Chase”

    Gary Snyder “Axe Handles” (I love this book, just never owned it)

    Christopher Camuto “Another Country”

    Barry Lopez “Arctic Dreams”

    I have a number of Camuto and Lopez books and really enjoyed them all, but haven’t yet read these.

    Btw, I read Reg Darling’s “Coyote Soul, Raven Heart” at Etter’s suggestion. Fantastic and highly recommended.

  • garydavis
    Member
    Post count: 101

    Your list sounds like you might enjoy “A dream In Polar Fog”

    Maritime Chucchi people just before the Russian Revolution reaches northern Siberia. Archipelago Press. Can’t remember authors name.

    Good reading,

    Gary

  • paleoman
    Member
    Post count: 911

    Don’ t ask me how I remember this….but there was a book called “The Beans of Egypt” I always wanted to reread. Not trad stuff, but quite a portrayal or rural life and poverty in Maine. Picture the scenes of junk filled yards, rampant poaching, etc., and the Bean family that lived among it all. Worth it if you can find it.

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    You’ll have to tell me which ones to buy. I’ll be buying the Camutto book either way.

    I got several books I’ve already read but wanted to own. I believe they were all your books too.

    “A rough shooting dog”

    “Heartsblood”

    “Indian Creek Chronicles”

    “The outlaw album” which is a collection of fictional stories by the same author as “winter’s bone”,which was probably the best fiction book I ever read.

    If you’ll remember Joe, I had to put it down to shoot that bear on Sunday of opening weekend.

  • tailfeather
    Member
    Post count: 417

    Those are all good! I’ve yet to get to Winter’s Bone.

  • tailfeather
    Member
    Post count: 417

    Thanks, Gary and Paleo. I’ll put em on the list.

    My wife got (and I just covertly swiped) “Postcards from Ed”, compiled and edited by our own Mr. Petersen. I’m dying to read it. Like he did for so many others, Abbey’s writing, discovered when I was 20 via a discounted copy of Desert Solitaire, greatly influenced my life.

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    tailfeather wrote: Those are all good! I’ve yet to get to Winter’s Bone.

    Don’t be a dope. Get to it. And you’d better get on Captain Zero too.

  • David Petersen
    Member
    Post count: 2765

    Dersu the Trapper — V.K. Arseniev

    The Tiger — John Vaillant

    Both are nonfiction and both take place in the Russian Far East, aka Siberia, in the same exact region. All my life I have preferred nonfiction over fiction and have read hundreds of great books, always with an eye to truly great writing and story-telling. These two are among the very best I know of, ever, anywhere, period. And both have excellent films made from them–Dersu Uzala (reviewed in TBM longa go), best foreign film of 1976, and Conflict Tiger, a chilling documentary film by Sasha Snow, with rights to The Tiger (TBM review forthcoming) recently bought by Brad Pitt for “a major motion picture.” I can’t wait. I had to order a CD of Conflict Tiger directly from Sasha in England, but I’ve heard you can stream it for free if you know where to look online, which I don’t. But do yourself a favor and read the books first. IMHO

    Good books are among the best things we can invest the precious moments of our lives in. If I have to be inside, I prefer to be inside a good book. Thanks for this thread and please, read your books on paper, not some electronic gadget. It’s traditional. πŸ˜€

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  • David Petersen
    Member
    Post count: 2765

    And this …

    attached file
  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    I’ll look those up Dave. I love finger picking through my bookshelf. It’s getting pretty big!

  • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
    Member
    Post count: 557

    I totally agree with Dave [I do not have a smidgen of his literary knowledge or skills- but I read A LOT! haha] , and also recommend these 2 books – I read Dersu a long time ago [saw the movie in a college art theatre]excellent.

    I found the Tiger very interesting! – the part about Russia’s “Wilderness Areas” set up by the Czar and still around thru all Russia’s turmoil to the present, very intriquing. Full of good info on the Land/people/nature in an exotic part of the world, all wrapped up in a Modern “Man Eating Tiger hunt” story!

    Scout.

  • tailfeather
    Member
    Post count: 417

    I know of Dersu the Trapper only from the chapter in Heartsblood. I need to read it.

    Speaking of Russians :wink:, I’ve been making more of an effort to read some more classic literature. Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, etc. I enjoy it, but sometimes have to make myself pick it up.

  • Reg Darling
    Member
    Post count: 33

    Two great and very different writers i would highly recommend are Rick Bass and Bernd Heinrich. Both are prolific writers and I’ve loved all their books, but two that come to mind right now as favorite’s are Bass’s The Wild Marsh and Heinrich’s Mind of the Raven. Grizzly Years by Doug Peacock is a classic that belongs on any hunter’s shelf–same applies to The Abstract Wild by Jack Turner.

  • paleoman
    Member
    Post count: 911

    Packing For Mars. Another one I’ve gotten into with great background into the various Nat’ l Space Programs and what it took to obtain and then fly a mission.

  • Col MikeCol Mike
    Member
    Post count: 906

    Books!!!

    Have all recommended, will check my library tomorrow for some rec. for you all. Next to new gear–books drive my wife crazy as I buy about 3 a week and read 4. Oh here is one for you–The wolves of Isle of Royale–Rolf Peterson- 1995 so a dated study but still significant.

    Think I’ve done a good job this evening from removing that Dave guy from the posting headlines although not as sage or informative–but then I am younger:D

    Have to sign off as we have two teams to run tomorrow on sleds in our first doable snow.

    Semper Fi

    Husky 6

  • Ben M.
    Member
    Post count: 461

    127 Hours–Aaron Ralston

    Into the Wild–John Krakauer

    Neither book is about archery or hunting but both are nonfiction accounts of intense life-altering experiences, just as trad bowhunting can be for the sensitive thinker.

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    “In the heart of the sea”

    “Great Heart”

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
    Member
    Post count: 1995

    I’ve nothing against a good book, but have a special place in my heart for short stories and essays. London’s To Build a Fire and To the Open Water by Jesse Hill Ford are two favorites. The latter I found in a collection called The Greatest Hunting Stories Ever Told, by Lamar Underwood. At first I thought that was a pretty cheeky title, but I have enjoyed many of the stories.

    Then, of course, are Hemmingway’s Nick Adam stories. I heard that Petersen guys has picked up a pen here and there… dwcphoto

  • lyagooshka
    Member
    Post count: 600

    DWC:

    If you like short stories, especially ones on the lighter side, I really liked “If You Didn’t Bring Jerky, What Did I Just Eat: Misadventures in Hunting, Fishing, and the Wilds of Suburbia” by Bill Heavey. Not really a “trad” book, but definitelly worth a read IMHO. I have to check out London and Underwood. I, too, like the short-story compilations. Don’t have to commit, in case that 8-pointer walks by πŸ˜† . Be well.

    Alex

    πŸ˜€

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    All of Tim Cahill’s books are excellent adventure writing. Those are all short stories too.

    “Pass the Butterworms” is one of my favorites

  • David Petersen
    Member
    Post count: 2765

    I second Etter on Cahill, for decades a hero of mine. That said, please allow a technical clarification. A “short story” is fiction, never nonfiction. A short nonfiction piece, like Cahill has written so many of, is an “article” if in a magazine or an “essay” or chapter in a book. Point being that Tim doesn’t write fiction. Like me, he finds reality far more magical and interesting than anything anyone could ever make up. Perhaps it’s a disease to think that way, but after reading a good sampling of Cahill I think you’ll agree. My favorite collection is his first, “Jaguars Ripped My Flesh.” As you may suspect, Tim is one funny dude (especially after a long night of drinking, but that’s another story). IMHO, as always 😯

  • lyagooshka
    Member
    Post count: 600

    Then I stand [sit] corrected. Bill Heavey’s book is a collection of “articles”. πŸ˜† πŸ˜† πŸ˜† Thanks for the correction on my improper use of nomenclature πŸ™‚ . Seriously, I have to get some of the Cahill collection. Sounds up my alley. Be well.

    Alex

    πŸ˜€

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    Amazon has a ton of Cahill’s books for sale for $.01. Used of course.

    Dave and Don, please don’t burn me at the stake for recommending something so treasonous as buying used books:D

  • David Petersen
    Member
    Post count: 2765

    Have no fear, Etter. On my wages I can’t afford the stake, the firewood or even the match. πŸ˜›

  • lyagooshka
    Member
    Post count: 600

    eBooks, my friends. Way of the future. Cheaper than print, and leaves those trees in the forest to do what they were meant to do. Hold up our stands! πŸ˜† Be well.

    Alex

    πŸ˜€

  • Col MikeCol Mike
    Member
    Post count: 906

    Two I’m sure you all are aware of–The Old Man and The Boy and The Old Mans Boy Grows Older–Robert Ruark. They have been reprinted in one volume. For some reason I have two copies–anyone want the extra? Hunting fishing and ethics all in one–great read.

    Semper Fi

    Mike

  • tailfeather
    Member
    Post count: 417

    Alex, I guess I have a little bit of collector’s mentality with regards to books. I love to see em on a shelf and hold em in my hand. I’m prone to take one down, read a favorite chapter or essay on the john, and put it back. Now what would happen if I dropped an ebook in the pot?:D

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    lyagooshka wrote: eBooks, my friends. Way of the future. Cheaper than print, and leaves those trees in the forest to do what they were meant to do. Hold up our stands! πŸ˜† Be well.

    Alex

    πŸ˜€

    I like to own books Cant see ever buying a kindle. My wife loves hers though.

  • Mark Turton
    Member
    Post count: 762

    Tailfeather, if you are looking for a book to read on the john try The Specialist by Charles (chic) Sale, I have a copy probably left here during WW2, always makes me smile.

    Mark.

  • lyagooshka
    Member
    Post count: 600

    tailfeather wrote: I’m prone to take one down, read a favorite chapter or essay on the john, and put it back. Now what would happen if I dropped an ebook in the pot?

    Feather, that’s why mine is in an OtterBox! πŸ˜† I actually cut out the trip and put a small bookshelf in the loo. I don’t think I would get 25% of the reading done that I do if it wasn’t for the can. I just didn’t want to sound weird. 😳

    Anyway, I agree on the romance of a book. It simply cannot be replaced by any tablet or notebook. Even though I love my Kindle, I still have certain books that I will always have in print. But an eReader makes it easier to carry a library into the field. Not saying it’s better, just an option.

    As always, great suggestions. Can’t wait to read a couple. Love the ones with the collection of articles (thanks again for the correction Dave). They are just long enough to pass the time (as discussed above) πŸ˜† . Be well.

    Alex

    πŸ˜€

  • James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1095

    lyagooshka wrote: eBooks, my friends.

    Yesterday I downloaded ‘Hunting with the Bow & Arrow’ by Saxton Pope for the modest price of $0.00 (from Amazon). That’s rather good value I’d say.

    Jim.

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    ausjim wrote: [quote=lyagooshka]eBooks, my friends.

    Yesterday I downloaded ‘Hunting with the Bow & Arrow’ by Saxton Pope for the modest price of $0.00 (from Amazon). That’s rather good value I’d say.

    Jim.

    Wow! I’ve bought a lot of books for a copper coin, but never for free.

  • lyagooshka
    Member
    Post count: 600

    I had that on another threat as well. I forgot to mention it here, so thank you Jim for the reminder. There are many “classics” available for download for free. Thing is, you don’t even need a kindle. There is a kindle app available for most smart-phones (iPhone, Android, Windows Phone). It is free, and so is an account on Amazon. So if you have a smart-phone (or better yet, a tablet like an iPad or Nexus), you don’t even need to get a kindle. I did because I wanted one. Now they have an even bigger one, but I am happy with mine. Only problem with the smart-phones is the size. Do-able while waiting in line at the DMV, but I wouldn’t make it my primary e-reader. Hope this helps. Be well.

    Alex

    πŸ˜€

  • BuckyT
    Member
    Post count: 138

    I’m on chapter 8 of “BloodTies” by Ted Kerasote. On loan from Etter.

    I really am enjoying this book. I’m already starting to burn through it nightly.

    I need to purchase quite a few of the books listed on this thread!

    I’ll be picking back up Illumination in the Flatwoods here shortly to read again before turkey season

  • Bunyan Morris
    Member
    Post count: 135

    ausjim wrote: [quote=lyagooshka]eBooks, my friends.

    Yesterday I downloaded ‘Hunting with the Bow & Arrow’ by Saxton Pope for the modest price of $0.00 (from Amazon). That’s rather good value I’d say.

    Jim.i did the same. There are tons of e books out there free.. many of the classics cost nothing. While I prefer turning pages and owning “real” books, I like the convenient portability of e books being contained in my smartphone and tablet.

    This thread contains a great list of outdoor reading. My daughter gave me Jack London’s The Call of the Wild for Christmas. I haven’t read it since I was a kid. I’m looking forward to starting it.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    A few other archery/outdoor/hunting titles available as ebooks that I’d recommend:

    “Longbows in the Far North” by Don Thomas

    “Meateater” by Steven Rinella

    “Hunt Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast” by Hank Shaw

    “Woodcraft and Camping” by George Washington Sears (free download!)

    “The Rise and Fall of the Second Largest Empire in History: How Genghis Khan’s Mongols Almost Conquered the World” by Thomas Craughwell

    and there’s a pretty good one called “Elkheart” by some crazy old Druid…:D

  • lyagooshka
    Member
    Post count: 600

    “Longbows in the Far North” by Don Thomas… That’s the one I was thinking of in my other post. And thanks for the freebie. My kindle is filled with them. Another one that comes up that is similar is: “Camping and woodcraft; a handbook for vacation campers and for travelers in the wilderness” Horace Kephart. Might download that too. But it’s $1.99. Be well.

    Alex

    πŸ˜€

  • David Petersen
    Member
    Post count: 2765

    Bruce — Who is selling Elkheart as an e-book? Are there any others? None of my books should be in that format and if they are, they’re illegal. They are not licensed to do that, so please don’t buy. In the past my publishers have had problems with amazon producing and selling their own e-books from my titles, totally illegally. The publisher and author get nothing, and at the same time if cuts down on book sales so all the honest players get screwed twice. It’s a dangerous world out there …

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    Yikes – that’s good to know, Dave, I bought the Kindle version about a year ago, but I just looked on Amazon, and apparently they are still offering it.

    That’s incredibly lame if they are doing that on their own, with no contractual arrangement with the publisher/author.

    πŸ‘Ώ

  • lyagooshka
    Member
    Post count: 600

    Dave,

    Just looked it up myself, and they are, in fact offering it. I am going to PM you a screen-shot. As much as I like Amazon, if they are doing something underhanded, I will be the first to let them know my business only goes to those with honor. Let us know. In the mean time, Elkheart was on my wish-list for the kindle. I will NOT buy it unless I hear from you. Be well.

    Alex

    😑

  • David Petersen
    Member
    Post count: 2765

    Well I’m glad you guys tipped me off, as I’ve been slack in checking on these things. Amazon is the Cabellas of the book world, with all the good and bad implications. I just ran a check and they in fact are selling Kindle editioins of all three of my remaining books with Johnson Press: Elkheart, The Nearby Faraway, and Writing Naturally. This came up a couple years ago and the publisher said they would take care of it; obviously they have not. This is thievery pure and simple. So far my other books, with Henry Holt and with Raven’s Eye Press, are safe. If any of you ever see electronic versions of any of my other books besides the three named above, will you please let me know? Electronic property thest. FYI, on average the author gets a 10% royalty on wholesale price. And standard discount to booksellers is 40-50%, to that a book you pay $20 retail for is sold wholesale by the publisher for $8-10, so I am making a whopping .80 to a buck per book. The middlemen get the rest. You can see why, unless you have a really really big seller, an author can be prolific yet remain in the sub-poverty income bracket as I generally have all these years. With ebooks, since the price is so much lower, we get even less when it’s legal and zero from amazon so far. If it were a major publisher like Holt, they would threaten to sue. But I don’t think Johnson figures it’s worth it. This is why I will never let any of my books legally go electronic. Since I’m mostly retired, Social Security, book royalties and sales from my website, and the bit of writing I do for TBM are the totallity of my income. My tax man said if my income this year is at the level of last year I won’t even have to file a return … I’m off the bottom of the map. Sorry to spill my personal financial beans to you, but I want people to know the blight that ebooks are to most authors.

  • lyagooshka
    Member
    Post count: 600

    Dave,

    Not to beat a dead horse, but it is very important to hear the “other side” of things. I cannot speak for others, but I quickly get caugth up in the great deals and other stuff. Sometimes we “assume” (everyone knows where that gets us) that everyone is playing by the rules and everyone is being FAIRLY taken care of. So, there is no reason (INHO) to appologize. If Amazon did something wrong, shame on them. I will be ordering “from the source” on this one. If they keep doing it, they will lose my business all together. It may not be much, but I am sure I’m not alone. Be well.

    Alex

    😑

  • David Petersen
    Member
    Post count: 2765

    Alex — Absolutely no apologies necessary, from you or anyone other than amazon. The publisher is working on it (again) as we speak. Even if they succeed in having the illegal ebooks disappeared, I doubt the publisher or I will ever see a penny from their sales. I really have no idea how widespread this problem is and quite likely it owes to corporate incompetence, that old devil lack of communications, rather than intended thievery. But the outcome is the same. Thanks for your support.

  • Robin ConradsRobin Conrads
    Admin
    Post count: 802

    After Dave’s dilemma I just randomly checked Amazon.com for T.J.’s books. Holy Cow! The Traditional Bowhunter’s Handbook is listed for hundreds of dollars! 😯 Used copies for $35 and up into the $100 range. That’s crazy! We sell that book for $25. I hope no one here has ever paid those high prices. They are listed by outside sellers (not Amazon directly) who probably paid $25 or less. Don’t get taken! I think the only books that I know of that go for that much money might be old Jay Massey books that are out of print and hard to find. Sheesh! Okay, back to work. πŸ˜†

  • James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1095

    David – that’s really unfortunate to hear. I always assumed because the bulk of book cost is in print/distribution, with those costs cut away an ebook selling at 50% of it’s tangible equivalent would still result in higher royalties for the author. Your case is genuine theft. But thank you for letting us know.

    Jim.

  • lyagooshka
    Member
    Post count: 600

    TBMADMIN wrote: After Dave’s dilemma I just randomly checked Amazon.com for T.J.’s books. Holy Cow! The Traditional Bowhunter’s Handbook is listed for hundreds of dollars! 😯 Used copies for $35 and up into the $100 range. That’s crazy! We sell that book for $25. I hope no one here has ever paid those high prices. They are listed by outside sellers (not Amazon directly) who probably paid $25 or less. Don’t get taken! I think the only books that I know of that go for that much money might be old Jay Massey books that are out of print and hard to find. Sheesh! Okay, back to work. πŸ˜†

    OK, I have to quote my favorite author here…

    Douglas Adams wrote: “When you’re cruising down the road in the fast lane and you lazily sail past a few hard-driving cars and are feeling pretty pleased with yhourself and then accidentally change down from fourth to first instead of third thus making your engine leap out of your hood in a rather ugly mess, it tends to throw you off your stride…”

    This is pretty much how I felt after reading Robin’s post. I have had that book in my “wish list” for like ever. I didn’t want to drop the few dollars on it until I exhausted my “cheaper” options. What gets me is not that I didn’t see it cheaper here, but that I never made the connection. Author, name, affiliation, etc. Then Robin writes about “T.J.” and all of the sudden I have one huge DUH!!!

    OK, so I’m not the brightest bulb on the string. Whatcha gonna do?

    Be well.

    Axel

    πŸ˜†

  • David Petersen
    Member
    Post count: 2765

    This is amazon’s reflection of eBay. These are speculators but really dumb ones. Some of my books, also, have outrageously high prices on used copies. A good friend here owns a book store and knows all about collectible book values, and those prices are generally reserved for first edition, out of print books by well known authors. For example, when Little-Brown published Edward Abbey’s personal journals, Confessions of a Barbarian, one investor bought a whole case of them and asked me to sign them (as editor), hoping that someday they would be worth something. But he’s going to have to wait a while as that book is still in print in paperback from the original publisher. But I can’t see that any paperback book, first edition or otherwise, and no matter who the author, should ever be worth more than it’s original cover price. In those same amazon “affiliates” listings that are shooting for the sky, you’ll see the same exact book sometimes for pennies and normally way under original retail price. So if you’re poor and love to read, your cheapest bet is to buy used from amazon affiliates and at least $25 at an order, so you get free shipping. That’s what I do when buying cd’s and dvd’s. It’s like shopping at WalMart: few of us are proud of it, given their awful reputation for abusing suppliers and workers, but then few of us can afford to pass up the savings. I am currently working on a new book, “The Good Hunt” (yes, same theme as the documentary film, on which I won’t make a penny but no matter) and I plan to self-publish it. That way I keep all profits, not just a small percentage, and have total control over everything like editing, art and layout, and sales. Of course I’ll also have to put up a couple months social security checks to get it in print and can only cross my fingers that it will earn back my investment. But it’s the only way to go now that the publishing industry has become so filthy and vile. Such a world we have created for ourselves, eh? But so long as we have true wild wilderness to walk into and camp and hunt and fish, we have a chance of remaining sane in an insane world.

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  • Robin ConradsRobin Conrads
    Admin
    Post count: 802

    lyagooshka wrote: OK, I have to quote my favorite author here…

    [quote=Douglas Adams]”When you’re cruising down the road in the fast lane and you lazily sail past a few hard-driving cars and are feeling pretty pleased with yhourself and then accidentally change down from fourth to first instead of third thus making your engine leap out of your hood in a rather ugly mess, it tends to throw you off your stride…”

    This is pretty much how I felt after reading Robin’s post. I have had that book in my “wish list” for like ever. I didn’t want to drop the few dollars on it until I exhausted my “cheaper” options. What gets me is not that I didn’t see it cheaper here, but that I never made the connection. Author, name, affiliation, etc. Then Robin writes about “T.J.” and all of the sudden I have one huge DUH!!!

    OK, so I’m not the brightest bulb on the string. Whatcha gonna do?

    Be well.

    Axel

    πŸ˜†

    I still like to think I got this job because I’m good at it, but yes, I’m married to the boss. πŸ˜† I can attest to his hard work and many years putting that book together. I’d recommend it even if I wasn’t married to him.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    I thought I’d revive this thread with a book I just started reading:

    Wolfer: A memoir

    by Carter Neimeyer

    His plan was to stay in Iowa, and maybe get a job counting ducks, or do a little farming. But events conspired to fling Carter Niemeyer westward and straight into the jaws of wolves. From his early years wrangling ornery federal trappers, eagles and grizzlies, to winning a skinning contest that paved the way for wolf reintroduction in the Northern Rockies, Carter Niemeyer reveals the wild and bumpy ride that turned a trapper – a killer – into a champion of wolves.

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    Sounds interesting.

    I just finished “walking it off” by doug peacock. It was a fantastic read.

  • James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1095

    I know Dave mentioned the recent availability elsewhere in the forum but I bought the Racks e-book last night. For us foreigners it’s such a convenient way to get a book overseas, although my bookshelf is poorer for the convenience. Anyway, my kindle tells me I’m 30% through. I can’t put it down!

    I wish more Petersen and Thomas books were available in electronic format πŸ˜€

    That being said I do cherish that paper-age throw back, a real book, that smells new then before long has coffee and wine stains on it’s pages, smudgy finger prints and other evidence of my consistent failures at maintaining a base level of personal hygiene. I like the idea that one day my kids will be casting their eyes over my bookshelves and might pick out one of my favourites…

  • Charles Ek
    Member
    Post count: 523

    “The Grizzly Maze – Timothy Treadwell’s Fatal Obsession With Alaskan Bears”, by Nick Jans.

    Think you know the Treadwell story? Nope, not until you’ve read this book. And the 31-page afterword (discussing the dangerousness of bears and what to do about it) is a rare piece of clarity on a subject too often characterized by a lot of BS.

  • David Petersen
    Member
    Post count: 2765

    Jim, indeed, after my rants earlier in this thread saying I would never do it, I did. Sort of. I used to have readers on darn near every continent, but the international postage got to crazy high that it cost more to ship than the book cost. Plus I hated waiting through the P.O. line to do the customs. And too, the alleged “The Good Hunt Film” will likely go public in Europe later this summer, which might stir some interest. So I took the four books I have control over (most remain with various publishers) and created e-book versions. Those are:

    Ghost Grizzlies

    Heartsblood

    Racks

    Going Trad.

    All are $9.95. Thanks for giving me an opening to shamelessly plug my own wares.

    ColMike has been here for 10 days and leaves today. We did a road trip to Teton NP, seriously lowered the local craft beer, gin and scotch reservoirs, and it has been good medicine for me. Thanks, Mike.

    attached file
  • wojo14
    Member
    Post count: 325

    Dave,

    Glad to hear you and Mike had a good time.

  • James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1095

    David Petersen wrote: Thanks for giving me an opening to shamelessly plug my own wares.

    Dave, thank you for giving into the shamelessly selfish pesting by myself and a few others to get them on ebooks πŸ˜‰

    I just finished e-Racks and have some new found interest in some animals that I before hadn’t given much thought to. You’ve helped educate one more person who is a world away. That’s an uncommon accomplishment my friend.

    By the way, Mike spilled the beans on your road trip and confessed that you two sour old marines hid inside from the rain πŸ˜† I’m glad you old boat monkeys had a good time though πŸ˜€

  • tailfeather
    Member
    Post count: 417

    Anybody read “In the Shadow of the Sabertooth”, Doug Peacock’s new book?

    Also by Peacock….good, current article below on threats to wilderness.

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/07/06/american-wilderness-faces-the-firing-squad.html

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    tailfeather wrote: Anybody read “In the Shadow of the Sabertooth”, Doug Peacock’s new book?

    Also by Peacock….good, current article below on threats to wilderness.

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/07/06/american-wilderness-faces-the-firing-squad.html

    I’m about to re-read “In the Presence of Grizzlies” by Peacock as soon as I finish the book I mentioned above. And I’d like to pick up “…Sabertooth” after that. It looks like a good read.

    And thanks for the link – Peacock is spot-on here, imo. The clamor to allow pack-rafting in Yellowstone (and what is far more concerning – the can of worms its going to open) is becoming a very divisive issue in my community. I don’t want to get on a rant, and Peacock already sums up the issue quite well, so I’ll stop there… πŸ˜‰

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2127

    Great article! I like the question at the end:

    “And, as the wolf still sculpts elk evolution, in what landscape today reside the forces that yet hone the human mind born of wildness?”

    Gary Snyder takes a wider view if the term “wild”. In his view, we are part of the land, same as every other critter. As such, we are wild too. Wilderness has no care or compassion for it’s membership. Live or die, it doesn’t matter. The story goes on.

    Somehow humanity has gotten the idea that we are not part of the wilderness, that we are not wild, and thus not subject to its rules. Those goons in DC are the result of this narcissism.

    I think the answer to Peacock’s question is that the limits of our biosphere and the vacuum of space are the landscape that will hone the human mind. Either that, or extinguish it. What we don’t understand is that in the end, it really doesn’t matter except to us. The universe will go on, with or without us.

    When it comes right down to it, the only “power” we have that the other wildlings don’t is the power to make ourselves go extinct. Hopefully we won’t use it 😯

  • wojo14
    Member
    Post count: 325

    Any recommendations on Native American hunting stories and styles?

    I have always been interested in Native American culture.

    I like reading nonfiction. There is far too much real adventures to read about!

    I have been killing these books lately! Going to ready for some more!

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    Just finished reading “Wolfer” by Carter Neimeyer.

    Essential reading for anyone interested in the real story of wolf re-introduction in the States. Written from the guy who was at “ground zero” for all of it. After you read this, you’ll be amazed that wolf re-introduction ever happened at all.

  • David Petersen
    Member
    Post count: 2765

    Wojo, check out “My Life as an Indian,” by James Willard Schultz, set in MT late 1800s among the Pegan Blackfeet. Presented as nonfiction but clearly many fictional elements, yet accurate history and great story-telling.

    There are also several excellent books on the Apache wars.

  • Troy Warner
    Member
    Post count: 241

    Smithhammer wrote: Just finished reading “Wolfer” by Carter Neimeyer.

    Essential reading for anyone interested in the real story of wolf re-introduction in the States. Written from the guy who was at “ground zero” for all of it. After you read this, you’ll be amazed that wolf re-introduction ever happened at all.

    It’s a very eye opening book and there are many anti wolf folks that think “he is the DEVEL” (Kathy Bates-the water boy) for even being such a large part of the reintroduction. It opened my mind to new thoughts.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    tradhunter1 wrote:

    It’s a very eye opening book and there are many anti wolf folks that think “he is the DEVEL” (Kathy Bates-the water boy) for even being such a large part of the reintroduction. It opened my mind to new thoughts.

    Yup. And, at the same time, he has been equally hated by those on the other side of the issue because as part of his job, he occasionally had to put some wolves down when they were found killing livestock (government policy).

    Anyone who can have both sides of the issue hating him that much is a character worth reading about, imo.

    It’s also worth pointing out though, that one of the big reasons so many ranchers hated him was because he refused to write up every dead livestock as a “wolf kill” just because a rancher said so. He did thorough investigations of every livestock carcass that was reported to be the result of a wolf, and in the vast majority of cases, he found no evidence that wolves were the culprit – it was usually disease, poor livestock mgmt. that resulted in an accident, etc. Very few people on the anti-side of the argument, or at the federal agency he worked for, wanted to hear that – they just wanted every livestock death attributed to wolves, even when the facts clearly said otherwise.

  • David Fudala
    Member
    Post count: 224

    I recently discovered the works of author Sigurd F. Olson. I found 3 of his books so far in thrift stores and flea markets here in Wisconsin and in Minnesota. The 3 I have are, “The Singing Wilderness”, “Runes of the North” and “Reflections of the North Country”. While not Trad Archery books, they are incredible reads with ‘Leopold-Like’ teachings on conservation. Being an Upper-Midwesterner and a frequent traveler of the Boundary Waters of Northern Minnesota, I’m quite embarrassed that I did not know of him earlier in life. Fantastic reads! I Read “Runes” while on vacation this year on Saganaga Lake in the BWCAW. For those with ties or interest in the Upper Great Lakes region, I highly recommend!

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    Currently on the nightstand:

    I still can’t decide if this is a good or bad book to read right before hunting season…..:shock:

  • Sveltri
    Member
    Post count: 2

    A Quiet Place of Violence by Allen Morris Jones

  • Charles Ek
    Member
    Post count: 523

    Smithhammer wrote:

    It’s also worth pointing out though, that one of the big reasons so many ranchers hated him was because he refused to write up every dead livestock as a “wolf kill” just because a rancher said so. He did thorough investigations of every livestock carcass that was reported to be the result of a wolf, and in the vast majority of cases, he found no evidence that wolves were the culprit – it was usually disease, poor livestock mgmt. that resulted in an accident, etc. Very few people on the anti-side of the argument, or at the federal agency he worked for, wanted to hear that – they just wanted every livestock death attributed to wolves, even when the facts clearly said otherwise.

    The same thing goes on in Norway among some Sami reindeer herders with regard to exaggerated reports of depredation by bears, wolves, wolverines and lynx.

  • Charles Ek
    Member
    Post count: 523

    dfudala wrote: Being an Upper-Midwesterner and a frequent traveler of the Boundary Waters of Northern Minnesota, I’m quite embarrassed that I did not know of him earlier in life. Fantastic reads! I Read “Runes” while on vacation this year on Saganaga Lake in the BWCAW. For those with ties or interest in the Upper Great Lakes region, I highly recommend!

    Better late than never. πŸ˜‰ He’s been a hero in my family since even before the days when he used to be hung in effigy in Ely. My mom grew up in Embarrass and I was raised in Duluth and the Cities. Family vacations were usually canoe trips.

    You’ll want to read pretty much everything he published.

    Hope Sag was kind to you and you didn’t have some extra, unplanned reading time …

  • David Fudala
    Member
    Post count: 224

    She punished us this year, Eids. Payback for the absolutely beautiful trip we had last year! Such is the way of Mother Nature, always keeps it even. Weather was rough and the bugs were the worst I’ve seen in 20 plus years of canoe country. Even so, there’s nowhere else I’d rather have been! Planning a bear hunt up there next fall. Been a while since I did one. No place more magical to chase Bruins!

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    Just downloaded to my reader:

  • James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1095

    Bruce, give us a little review of the Barebow! books when you’ve read them please. I’ve seen them on Amazon for a while, but always been put off, if you can believe it, by the exclamation point. That struck me as a book that was going to try and force some excitement.

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
    Member
    Post count: 1995

    Dave P,

    I went to the Big A to see if your downloadable books would work on an iphone. I decided to read a few reviews before calling it a night and went directly to the one star reports. I can now lie down for the night with a smile on my kisser knowing we don’t all think alike… Keep em coming! peace, dwc

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    Brian Sorrells’ new book just arrived in the mailbox:

  • Cladinator
    Member
    Post count: 25

    I am currently reading Njal’s Saga. It’s one of the Icelandic Sagas. Anyone not familiar with the Icelandic Sagas should check them out.

    Read Egil’s Saga. It might very well be the best story I have ever read.

  • Col MikeCol Mike
    Member
    Post count: 906

    Thanks for the tip–never read one but this winter should be a good time to start.

    Mike

  • Alexandre Bugnon
    Member
    Post count: 680

    thanks for the headsup, Smithhammer! I will get the Doug Peacock book! Maybe Brian Sorrell’s as well. I remember a a fun book he wrote some years ago. I don’t have it anymore but it was a good one.

  • tailfeather
    Member
    Post count: 417

    I loaded up on new and used books for Christmas. Many I’ve read but didn’t own, others I’ve always wanted, a few I’ve never even heard of. These oughta keep me busy for awhile:D.

    Winter: Notes from Montana -Rick Bass

    The Wild Marsh – Rick Bass

    Crossing Open Ground – Barry Lopez

    All the Pretty Horses – Cormac McCarthy

    A Good Life Wasted: 20 yrs as a fishing guide – Dave Ames

    Sky Time in Gray’s River: Living for Keeps in a Forgotten Place – Robert Pyle

    The Practive of the Wild – Gary Snyder

    The Backcountry – Gary Snyder

    Mountains and Rivers Without End – Gary Snyder

    Backcast – Lou Ureube

    Close Range – Annie Proulx

    For the Health of the Land – Aldo Leopold

    A Pilgrim at Tinker Creek – Annie Dillard

    The Tiger – John Vaillant

    Walking it Off – Doug Peacock

    Trad Bowyers Bible Vol 1

    Omnicores Dilemma – Michael Pollan

    In Defense of Food – Michael Pollan

    A Hunter’s Heart, Dave Petersen, ed.

    On the Wild Edge, D Petersen

    Traditional Bowhunting, Clay Hayes

    Trout Bum – John Gierach

    Standing in a River Waving a Stick – John Gierach

    One Man’s Wilderness: An Alaskan Odyssey – Sam Keith

    Wildwoods Wisdom – Doug Elliott

    The Dream of the Earth – Thomas Berry

    What the River Knows – Wayne Fields

  • DK
    Member
    Post count: 86

    The tiger

    Man made of elk

    Dersu the trapper

    Death in the long grass

    Heart of the sea

  • R2R2
    Member
    Post count: 2314

    Smithhammer wrote: Just downloaded to my reader:

    I wish the person I loaned this book to would return it. Sad at my young age that I cannot remember who I loaned it to. πŸ˜₯

  • David Petersen
    Member
    Post count: 2765

    My own favorite among tailfeather’s list comes at the bottom, in his sign-off quote from The Big Sky. I was greatly privileged to know and even work with Bud Guthrie during the last decade of his life. I (and many others, including the Pulitzer judges in 1951) rank Guthrie as high among the greatest writers America has ever produced. Start with The Big Sky and you’ll be hooked for all the others to follow … as happened to me in my early teens. It’s the nature of our culture that even the greatest among us, as time goes on, will be forgotten in favor of contemporary mediocrity. Reading Guthrie is an antidote to that sad short-sightedness.

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
    Member
    Post count: 1995

    Spent much of Sunday reading Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Spear. It was required reading in my son’s sixth grade class. It’s about a twelve year old boy in the Maine wilderness in mid 1700s. A good read for a twelve year old boy and his dad.

    Last Child in the Woods. Preaching to the chior here, but a good work on the importance of getting outside beyond the lines.

    One Hundred Years of Solitude. I think i started that one five times before I took hold of it. One of the best reads ever.

    Basin and Range by John McPhee. Great story teller makes geology really interesting.

    And yep, I’m a sucker for that guys Petersen’s work. There’s a guy that’s on every man’s side, but many will sadly never know it. Dwc

  • FallguyFallguy
    Member
    Post count: 320

    DWCphoto, if you are looking for another book to share with your son try Gary Paulsen’s book “The Hatchet”. If the 2 of you enjoy that one he has several other titles that are good for young and old. My son and I read at least 6-8 of them when he was in his early teens.

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
    Member
    Post count: 1995

    That’s a good one. We started that and then got side tracked with school work. I also wanted to add My Side of the Mountain, which was my favorite as a kid. My son loved it, too. dwc

  • Ptaylor
    Member
    Post count: 538

    I just finished “American Catch” by paul Greenberg. His first book was “Four Fish”. Both are informative and fun reads.

    Tailfeather- I read “For the Health of the Land” this Fall. It was great reading some unpublished essays of Leopold’s.

    Currently I’m working on “Arctic Dreams” Barry Lopez. Fantastic so far.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    Re-reading these two right now:

  • William WarrenWilliam Warren
    Member
    Post count: 1365

    Ben M. wrote: 127 Hours–Aaron Ralston

    Into the Wild–John Krakauer

    Neither book is about archery or hunting but both are nonfiction accounts of intense life-altering experiences, just as trad bowhunting can be for the sensitive thinker.

    I recently read Into the Wild. Fascinating but also very sad.

    If you liked these you might also like Wild by Cheryl Strayed. Also not about archery but deals with addiction, dysfunction and loss. Literally at a fork in the road. I mentioned it because unfortunately Cheryl encountered bowhunters that were not representitive of all bow hunters. The problem was not that they were bowhunters but that they did not conduct themselves in a respectful manner and that was very disappointing. But the truth is that type of person exists.

    And for another similar story set in the Colonial Dutch West Indies, try The Ten Thousand Things by Maria Dermout.

    a tragic story with amazing descriptions of the sea and islands fauna and flora and a bit of animism in the customs of the islands.

    I enjoy fiction and non-fiction alike. Probably my favorite fiction writer is Jim Harrison. Start with True North and go from there. If you like it you will only want more!

  • William WarrenWilliam Warren
    Member
    Post count: 1365

    Smithy,

    Seeing your volume by Larry McMurtry reminded me that I saw Larry’s son James, a singer and actor playing live at the Continental in Austin Tx back in October. Good stuff.

    Duncan

  • William WarrenWilliam Warren
    Member
    Post count: 1365

    Dave,

    The Big Sky is now on my “to read” list at your suggestion and The Dream of the Earth on Tailfeathers list sounds interesting too.

    Duncan

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
    Member
    Post count: 1995

    Duncan,

    Into the Wild was a great, sad, read. I enjoyed the movie, too. What I really love from all this is the sound track of the movie, by Eddy Vedder. Beautiful, sad, haunting stuff. thanks, dwc

  • William WarrenWilliam Warren
    Member
    Post count: 1365

    dwcphoto wrote: Duncan,

    Into the Wild was a great, sad, read. I enjoyed the movie, too. What I really love from all this is the sound track of the movie, by Eddy Vedder. Beautiful, sad, haunting stuff. thanks, dwc

    I want to see the movie but also sort of don’t. May wait for it to hit Netflix.

  • paleoman
    Member
    Post count: 911

    I have a book from author Kent Nerburn. A Haunting Reverence. I find myself going back to it now and then. Has anyone read anything more from him? From what I gather the author has been in search of a native American spirituality and as such, love and respect for the land and place strike a chord with me. Seems a good fit here with a land ethic theme. Anyone familiar with more of his work?

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
    Member
    Post count: 1995

    Paleo, a bit off subject perhaps, but what is the Polish proverb about? Thank you. Dwc

  • William WarrenWilliam Warren
    Member
    Post count: 1365

    dwcphoto wrote: Paleo, a bit off subject perhaps, but what is the Polish proverb about? Thank you. Dwc

    Not answering for Paleoman but I’ve owned goats and they are very good climbers. Google Goats in Trees.

  • paleoman
    Member
    Post count: 911

    dwcphoto wrote: Paleo, a bit off subject perhaps, but what is the Polish proverb about? Thank you. Dwc

    Dwc – I found it looking for something profound:D and it struck me funny. I can take some guesses at best. Maybe even a dumb goat will take a shortcut to the top????

  • William Rice Spann
    Member
    Post count: 7

    Paleo…just finished “Neither Wolf nor Dog” by Kent Nerburn. Excellent book! Thanks to everyone for all the ideas… I’ve got my nose in 3 books tonight.

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
    Member
    Post count: 1995

    Paleo, i like it, whatever it means!

    With winter hard upon us, a good read is “To Build a Fire” Jack London. Now, that’s cold! Dwc

  • David Becker
    Member
    Post count: 110

    I very much enjoyed Craig Childs “The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild.”

    He’s got a bunch of other books I’ll have to add to my reading list. Books get added to that list faster than they get taken off. I need to hurry up and retire.

    A recently released book that I’m quite excited about, but haven’t read yet, is “Distant Neighbors: The Selected Letters of Wendell Berry and Gary Snyder.” If it wasn’t for those two guys, I wouldn’t be who I am today. Well, I have to blame Marty Stouffer a little too.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    Spent a little time at the library this afternoon – two new books on the nightstand:

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    Duncan wrote: Smithy,

    Seeing your volume by Larry McMurtry reminded me that I saw Larry’s son James, a singer and actor playing live at the Continental in Austin Tx back in October. Good stuff.

    Duncan

    Duncan –

    Apologies, I somehow overlooked your post above. I try to never miss a McMurtry show ’round these parts if at all possible. He’s even played in the summer free concert series in the city park in our dinky little hometown a few times, which has been a treat.

    Still working my way through the book above on the history of the fur trade in our valley, but I’m also going back and re-reading this again as well:

    Such a classic. Written in 1906 and still relevant today. It belongs on every woods bum’s bookshelf, imo.

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    I’ve not read much lately for some reason but it is time to get back in the shelf. I typically read “Illumination in the Flatwoods” before every turkey season and this year will be no different. If you haven’t read it, please do.

    I’ll also soon re-read both of Ben Kilham’s books on black bears when the summer scouting season starts.

    Bruce, I know I told you about “Deep Enough for Ivorybills”. I would surely recommend that to anybody as a great series of essays on hunting, fishing, and outdoor theology set in the deep south. That book set the tone for my early life here.

    I’m about to go on a serious amazon spree and “Wolfer” is at the top of my list but I cannot for the life of me remember all the titles you spoke of so recommend me a few Bruce.

  • Stephen Smiley
    Member
    Post count: 46

    Some great recommendations, I just finished The Big Sky and ordered the rest of the books in the series, should be here next week. Also picked up Sacagawea’s Nickname and Wind Sand and Stars. That should keep me busy until the others come in. It was 10 below zero with a howling wind this morning. Cant wait to get back home and fire up the woodstove and get some more reading in. This going to work every day is really getting in the way of what I want to be doing.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    Etter1 wrote:

    I’m about to go on a serious amazon spree and “Wolfer” is at the top of my list but I cannot for the life of me remember all the titles you spoke of so recommend me a few Bruce.

    Sean – for the life of me, I can’t remember all the titles I spoke of either! But a number of them are probably in this thread.

    I think I recommended this one somewhere on here in the past, but if you’re an archery history buff, “Arrows of Steel” by Vic Hurley is a good one.

    Anyone read “Toxophilite” by Fred Anderson?

  • Ptaylor
    Member
    Post count: 538

    Etter1 wrote: I’ve not read much lately for some reason but it is time to get back in the shelf. I typically read “Illumination in the Flatwoods” before every turkey season and this year will be no different. If you haven’t read it, please do.

    I’ll also soon re-read both of Ben Kilham’s books on black bears when the summer scouting season starts.

    That’s funny Etter, I’m the same way. I read Kilham’s books and “Walking with bears” each spring before the bear rut, and an excellent book about black-tail deer by Boyd Iverson before every deer hunt I do.

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    Ptaylor wrote: [quote=Etter1]I’ve not read much lately for some reason but it is time to get back in the shelf. I typically read “Illumination in the Flatwoods” before every turkey season and this year will be no different. If you haven’t read it, please do.

    I’ll also soon re-read both of Ben Kilham’s books on black bears when the summer scouting season starts.

    That’s funny Etter, I’m the same way. I read Kilham’s books and “Walking with bears” each spring before the bear rut, and an excellent book about black-tail deer by Boyd Iverson before every deer hunt I do.

    I read walking with bears based on your rec and loved it too. It’s a little slower read than Kilham’s books but a ton of great info!

  • David Becker
    Member
    Post count: 110

    Ptaylor wrote: [quote=Etter1]I’ve not read much lately for some reason but it is time to get back in the shelf. I typically read “Illumination in the Flatwoods” before every turkey season and this year will be no different. If you haven’t read it, please do.

    I’ll also soon re-read both of Ben Kilham’s books on black bears when the summer scouting season starts.

    That’s funny Etter, I’m the same way. I read Kilham’s books and “Walking with bears” each spring before the bear rut, and an excellent book about black-tail deer by Boyd Iverson before every deer hunt I do.

    Hey Ptaylor, have your read Terkla’s “Hunting Black Tailed Deer, An Oregon Perpective?” I think there is plenty in there that would translate to Northern California.

    I learned quite a bit from that book. I really enjoyed Terkla’s take on hunting too. He had quite a bit of respect for deer, and cared not a whit about horn size.

    Looks like it is still in print:

    http://www.amazon.com/Hunting-Black-Tailed-Deer-Oregon-Perspective/dp/1878175181/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1424737639&sr=8-1&keywords=hunting+black+tailed+deer+oregon+perspective

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    Thanks for the reminder about Kilham – I’ve had “In the Company of Bears” on my wish list for a while now. I’m going to grab a copy just as soon as I finish the other 4 books I’m reading right now…:wink:

  • Ptaylor
    Member
    Post count: 538

    Wose wrote: [quote=Ptaylor][quote=Etter1]I’ve not read much lately for some reason but it is time to get back in the shelf. I typically read “Illumination in the Flatwoods” before every turkey season and this year will be no different. If you haven’t read it, please do.

    I’ll also soon re-read both of Ben Kilham’s books on black bears when the summer scouting season starts.

    That’s funny Etter, I’m the same way. I read Kilham’s books and “Walking with bears” each spring before the bear rut, and an excellent book about black-tail deer by Boyd Iverson before every deer hunt I do.

    Hey Ptaylor, have your read Terkla’s “Hunting Black Tailed Deer, An Oregon Perpective?” I think there is plenty in there that would translate to Northern California.

    I learned quite a bit from that book. I really enjoyed Terkla’s take on hunting too. He had quite a bit of respect for deer, and cared not a whit about horn size.

    Looks like it is still in print:

    http://www.amazon.com/Hunting-Black-Tailed-Deer-Oregon-Perspective/dp/1878175181/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1424737639&sr=8-1&keywords=hunting+black+tailed+deer+oregon+perspective

    Wose,

    I have never heard of this book or its author! I’m looking into it right now, thanks for the tip!

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    Smithhammer wrote: Thanks for the reminder about Kilham – I’ve had “In the Company of Bears” on my wish list for a while now. I’m going to grab a copy just as soon as I finish the other 4 books I’m reading right now…:wink:

    Read both of them for sure!

  • tailfeather
    Member
    Post count: 417

    I havent been reading as much as usual the last few weeks. I have a stockpile I must get to.

    BUT….I did start my mostly annual pre-turkey season reading of “Better on a Rising Tide”, by Tom Kelly. My favorite turkey hunting book…..a true gem of a book.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    Wojo – you had asked a while back about ‘Native American stories.’ I would recommend the book “Ishi – The Last of His Tribe” by Theodora Kroeber.

    Just started this last night:

  • Etter1
    Member
    Post count: 831

    Bruce, I’m jealous. You will be amazed.

    Bear hunting is the biggest hypocrisy in my life. I love them like I can’t even express but I still hunt them. Every bear I’ve ever killed has been accompanied by an overwhelming feeling of sadness as well.

    Once you have spent much time with them, or read Kilham’s books, they command a different sort of respect than the rest of our “game” animals.

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
    Member
    Post count: 1995

    On someone’s recommendation here, I bought Hatchet for my son. He started, then had to put it down for required readings in school. The other night I saw him reading another copy, as a school assignment, so I picked up his copy off the shelf. Great read. Only about half-way through, but really good stuff. Thanks, dwc

  • Ptaylor
    Member
    Post count: 538

    Etter1 wrote: Bruce, I’m jealous. You will be amazed.

    Bear hunting is the biggest hypocrisy in my life. I love them like I can’t even express but I still hunt them. Every bear I’ve ever killed has been accompanied by an overwhelming feeling of sadness as well.

    Once you have spent much time with them, or read Kilham’s books, they command a different sort of respect than the rest of our “game” animals.

    I’m in the same camp with you Etter.

  • Ptaylor
    Member
    Post count: 538

    Dave P., in his writing, has constantly spoke in such high regard of Paul Shepard, I am ashamed to admit I only recently ordered two of his books. They just arrived today, and after I finish what I’m currently working on I will dive into:

    The Tender Carnivore

    &

    Coming Home to the Pleistocene

    Super excited!

  • FallguyFallguy
    Member
    Post count: 320

    dwcphoto wrote: On someone’s recommendation here, I bought Hatchet for my son. dwc

    Glad to see you both are enjoying the book. Check out the rest of Gary’s books. I believe my son has at least 7 or8 of his books. When he left home for college he took them all with him.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Member
    Post count: 2515

    I finished up “Out On a Limb” which I enjoyed even more than I expected. A very thought-provoking read, for sure. I’ve now handed it off to the Better Half who is keen to read it as well.

    And now I’m scratching an itch to go back and re-read this classic:

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
    Member
    Post count: 1995

    Fallguy, might check them out for summer reading. Maybe a good idea to take to scout camp this year. Thanks.

    Smithhammer, haven’t read that yet but hope to before too long.

    Just ordered Clay’s book and I’m reading Dave’s Writing Naturally and Confessions of a Barbarian, Edward Abbey jounal selections, edited and forward by Dave P. Small wonder I take forever to finish a book. Too many at once. Dwc

  • Col MikeCol Mike
    Member
    Post count: 906

    Here is another that I just discovered, “Shadow of the Hunter” Richard Nelson. Not trad bow but an amazing collection of stories that follow a group of hunters and their families through the cycle of an arctic year. Nelson spent a year with the Tareogmiut, or “people of the sea”. Published 1980 and available on Amazon.

    Enjoy.

    Semper Fi

    Mike

  • arthurw
    Member
    Post count: 35

    On my table in front of me now is Welding for Dummies, Shots at Whitetails by Larry Koller, and Traditional Bowhunters magazine. On the bookshelf you can find stuff such as Elmer Keith’s Sixguns, Advanced Custom Rodbuilding by Clemens, Ruark’s Old Man and Boy 1&2, a history book so old that toward the end there was a question of whether Geronimo was gonna stay on the reservation in Florida this time, many fishing books fresh and salt, Corbett, Buck, Geirach, Zane Grey, McManus, Heavey, Lamour, just from memory without getting off the couch to look. Anybody around here interested in Freemasons? I have two very strange books, kinda like rituals from the 1920s.

    Oops, only one is from 1920, the other must be newer since it mentions a big meeting that took place in 1936. Not looking to sell, but would like to get them back to the lodge. It seems wrong to have them. Can’t read one since it’s in Latin?

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
    Member
    Post count: 1995

    Just found Archery Anatomy cheap. Should be on the shelf in a few days. Dwc

  • Ptaylor
    Member
    Post count: 538

    Received for Xmas:

    Have Bow Will Travel & Longbow Country by Don Thomas

    Now… by Ed Ashby

    and just finished re-reading Wolves in the Land of Salmon by David Moskowitz.

  • Idabow
    Member
    Post count: 66

    Santa (my wife) got me Dave’s “Going Trad” for Christmas. Like all of his writings, I can’t put this one down either.

  • Ptaylor
    Member
    Post count: 538

    Since Steve brought it back up, here’s one I just finished: “The Ohlone Way” by Margolin and Harney. Read if you feel like dreaming of how life was the old way..

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